Comments on Question #2

Question #2: Should the City of Bend eliminate the requirement that new housing (single-family, duplexes, triplexes, quadplexes, townhomes, cottage clusters, apartments) provide a minimum number of off-street parking spaces

Displaying 1 - 100 of 553

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Several houses in our neighborhood have single car driveways. Most houses have two cars. This makes parking on our cul de sac difficult.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

I worry that if off street parking requirements are eliminated, more cars will crowd our already crowded streets. This is also a concern for safe emergency vehicle access.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

We still need street parking!

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Eliminating the off street parking requirement for new development will destroy the quality of life in nearby neighborhoods.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Parking is essential to keep Bend the Bend we love!

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Shouldn’t even be a MINIMUM number, should be the number of parking spaces actually needed for the number of tenants expected to have cars.

Response:

Yes

Comment on Question #2:

Builders need to provide driveways, parking spaces or lots if they are building. We don’t want a lot of cars parked along our streets especially in winter with snow and no plowing

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

The current parking requirement is inadequate. There are areas where there is so much on street parking due to not enough off street parking (i.e. around Worthy Brewing) that the streets are so clogged that it is a safety issue for emergency vehicles.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Bend is not like some of the bigger cities in the Willamette Valley. Autos are necessary to most residents here, especially in neighborhoods such as Boyd Acres with shopping and downtown areas farther than walking distance (especially for an aging population). Almost every household owns at least one auto, and many in our neighborhood own more than two with some parked on the street at all times!! I cannot imagine the congested streets with all cars for duplexes, townhomes etc having to park on the street! The townhomes under construction at the corner of Empire and Boyd Acres have garages under the two story homes which seems like a very workable arrangement with no “wasted land” as some have characterized this issue. But cars will not be going away anytime soon and elimination of parking spaces requirements will just frustrate car owners of any housing type. This kind of pressure is unnecessary and making this change is just not good sense!!

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Adequate off-street parking is essential for all homes, apartments, condos, etc. Driving on nighborhood streets is much safer if the streets are not clogged with parked cars lining both sides of the street. Think about walkability and biking safety. Pedestrians need safe areas to walk and cross. Difficult/dangerous street crossing occurs in areas with low visibility caused by densely parked cars.

Response:

Yes

Comment on Question #2:

2 spots for each Bedroom

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Answer to the first question would depend on where you live.
Our on street parking in the neighborhood is used to slow traffic down.
Who is setting the minimum parking space requirement and what is it based on? Number of bedrooms? Specific qty per structure? I don’t feel there is enough info to answer this.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Why should neighborhoods be adversely impacted by new development.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

There should be street parking available for residents living in Bend.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

My most direct route to & from work/ kids schools has several complexes on a narrow and busy road. They offer what seems to be half of the parking spaces for the number of units, and they’re building FOUR MORE complexes!!! That road is extremely dangerous already, and nearly impassable if there is significant snow.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Homes should have their own parking, driveway or garage.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

I've lived in a city with minimal off-street parking. Having a car that was needed for my work, it was an atrocious existence. In the winter time it created bad behavior between neighbors. There are too many factors that cause Bend residents to own and drive their cars - travel to recreation, getting around on Sundays, traveling to a larger city for services that don't exist in Bend. Residents are cognizant of energy conservation and own fuel efficient, hybrid or electric cars. We don't need nor are we able to totally eliminate our vehicles.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

There are too many people parking on the roads - if you allow or build a house or apartment, assume that everyone has 1 or 2 cars and plan accordingly. The streets are for driving, not full time parking spots.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

In certain areas where there is easy walking access to retail, employment, and services, as well as transit, it may be appropriate to eliminate the requirement. However, it should not be eliminated city-wide.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Anyone building residential housing should provide a spot for the residents to park. Plenty of times, I have small kids or dogs run out into the street from behind a car that is parked on the side of the street.
Even the neighborhood greenways are difficult to manuever because parking on each side of the street narrows the corridor that is supposed to be safe for walkers & bikes. No bike lanes & lines of cars do not provide a safe greenway!!

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

There is not street parking in dense areas. Let alone the ability to drive down the street safely with cars park on both sides of the road. Not really a 2-lane road anymore. Dense street parking is unsafe with kiddos playing in neighborhoods. Sight-lines terrible.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Look at all the apartments on Dalton off of hwy 20. There still is nowhere for anyone to park which if destroying people’s property values.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Bend already has enough issues with cars parking curbside on narrow streets resulting in only one car passage at a time. Where are people supposed to park if their place of residence does not have adequate parking? Bend does not have the infrastructure (public transportation, proximity to services, etc.) to expect people to take public transportation, ride bikes, or walk...particularly during the winter months. Are people over the age of 65 expected to ride bikes or walk. What about individuals with disabilities? This plan makes no sense. In a larger city with adequate public transportation and proximity to services within walking distance and where weather isn't the issue during winter months, this might make sense. In addition, as Bend continues to expand further out from the center of town, this really isn't a logical solution!

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

When multi family dwellings do not contain adequate off street parking for residents the properties, and area, become trashy, have lower value, and are unsafe for area residents. Crime goes up.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

It is so rare that people in Bend don't own a car. It will just cause more congestion on the street and become a burden.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

just look at Awbrey Road between Newport Ave and Portland Ave. What a mess - cars parked on both sides of the street

Response:

Yes

Comment on Question #2:

People should be able to park by their house on the street as well as off street.

Response:

Yes

Comment on Question #2:

I not sure about how to answer question #2 but I suppose eliminating off street parking requirements makes developing easier? My home in the West Hills has a very steep driveway and we rely upon parking on the street often. We think about adding an ADU as we have .3 acre and could potentially add a parking space for it with development but we’d still rely on the road for our car(s). Use of road parking is important to us.

Response:

Yes

Comment on Question #2:

We shouldn’t waste land on parking spots when we need more housing density in the town’s core area.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Renters of single family homes should not be able to park as many cars as they want in a neighborhood. I have 5 college kids next door and a few of them have more than one car and they are parked all over forcing homeowners not to be able to park even close to their home.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Any new housing should accommodate parking for all residents and guests.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

The idea of eliminating parking for a given residence is RIDICULOUS!! It is bizarre to even consider such a thing. As it is, the requirements for parking fail to provide enough parking in the "real world" of rental properties, duplexes, apartments, etc.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

In portland the builders were no longer required to have parking for multi family dwellings. It was a true disaster in neighborhoods where this occurred., especially in city type neighborhoods. People living in the area could not find parking. People had fights, coming home late night parking blocks away. It is a dream world to think people won’t have cars. Families with kids in activities, etc we are a very mobil society and even if they don’t use them to go to work people still have cars.
I think the rules should be different based on location and number of expected people per dwelling ie single family home vs multi unit apartments, condos etc.

Response:

Yes

Comment on Question #2:

I think every residence shall have their own private parking as well as off street parking.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Awbrey Road, near downtown is an example of allowing on street parking. It's a dangerous route to drive through and two cars can't get by each other. The congestion is terrible. There needs to be off street parking.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Drive down any street with apartments and see that all of the parking on the street is taken up by apartment renters since Bend currently only requires 1 1/2 parking spaces per apartment. A good example is in NW Crossing Discovery park near the dog park.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

They should provide at least one and 1/2 parking spaces per unit built.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

A high percentage of homeowners/renters have at least 1 car/person in city dwellings. Apartment complexes likewise should provide for more than 1 car/ apartment if residence allows more than 1 person/unit! GET OVER IT- EVERYONE HAS A CAR SO PLAN FOR IT AND DON'T ALLOW OVERFLOW TO PARK ON STREETS!
This is especially serious in neighborhoods where AIRBNB and other rental units are present. The streets are already too narrow to allow for parking on both sides in some older neighborhoods.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Ridiculous idea.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

I hate cars in the street. It’s dangerous and blocks your view. Especially on narrow streets. We ban parking in our neighborhood you can’t park on any of the streets. It’s a model for Bend. Put it in your garage or driveway. If you can’t do that you should not own a car. If builders are being allowed to build without parking in mind it’s because you allow them to. Homes should not be allowed to be rented out with multiple families and individuals in them. E.g causing one home/apartment to have 6 cars attached to it forcing them on the street. This is all very silly and easily corrected. We also fine violators if they have a car parked in the street. Ban parking in the street and fine violators. Your budget problems will be resolved in 12 months.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Of course folks should be required to have private parking spaces for the cars they will likely own!

Creating more One Way streets in older neighborhoods with tight parking would increase safety.

Response:

Yes

Comment on Question #2:

Why should builders be alloy to not provide parky. There is no parking now as it is. Provide parking y for new development. If nothing development should not be aloes. Our city is already at Max capacity. So what happens in the future? City is so GREEDY

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Housing MUST accommodate the transport needs of the housed. That means cars.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Eliminating minimum off-street parking requirements will clog streets with parked cars, making it harder to navigate and for residents and non-residents to find parking. Even if residents may not have a car, their visitors often will and so having a parking spot is useful for the resident and community.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Street parking creates hazards for autos, cyclists.
I believe the majority of council members would like to see all autos banished from the city and this is merely their method of beginning that process. Also it enables more dense housing that will encourage an even greater population. All these factors contribute to a lower quality of life. Those who want to eliminate off street parking should move back where they came from or perhaps Portland, LA, San Francisco instead of turning our formerly liveable city into a replica of their politically correct ideal.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Please keep parked cars off of residential streets - it can be a safety and security issue.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

In my judgment, Bend is not structured in a way that offers walkable access to services nor a public transportation system that would reasonably accommodate residential citizens.

Response:

Yes

Comment on Question #2:

I do favor policy that makes people responsible for the cost of their choices, ie whether they or the planet can afford more cars.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

We should have multiple options for parking and parking requirements. Density issues could factor into decisions. Perhaps a reduction to the minimum off street parking requirements.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Neighborhoods are becoming very dangerous for kids and pedestrians with the amount of cars parked on the street. People park in crosswalks, up to the edge of driveways, etc...

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Once gone you can never reclaim that space this is a permanent decision that will create the need for a paid permit system for residents to park in front of their own homes. Many homes downtown do not have garages and only a small driveway. It will absolutely be cluttered with limited visibility for drivers in the area. This is not the direction we want to take Bend.
If you want a diverse population of residents then you need to make decisions that support that. This will drive out families with young children, where do they play? And park?
Disabled, elderly, all would have to walk to their vehicles. Only young people will live there.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Many Bend streets are already too narrow for parking AND cars to pass. At MINIMUM one space for every bedroom should be required. Can use bicycles when possible, but how to get to Dr. appts etc that are further away (like in the medical area around hospital) without vehicle.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

This is a onerous and unrealistic proposal promoted by the "Strong Towns" political group from Minnesota. Bend is a VERY isolated and small city with inadequate and inconvenient local and intercity public transportation. The planning focus should be on accommodating the existing transportation needs of its residents, including space for their necessity of private automobiles, and not signing on to another urban planning activist fad that will turn into a debacle.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Most homes are 2 income homes so more cars are needed. At least 1 off street parking per household is needed.

Response:

Yes

Comment on Question #2:

1 space for 1 bedrm unit; 2 spaces for single resident house; 1-1/2 space per unit for multi-unit buildings

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

It doesn't make sense to put that parking burden on surrounding neighborhoods and city streets.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Similar rules in Portland have led to huge overcrowding of city streets in neighborhoods around large residential complexes. Even if transit, bike paths etc are available and residents use them, most people still have a car for occasional uses. Eliminating parking for some residential buildings will impact everyone else negatively and the tradeoff isn't worth it. The city would be better off eliminating the approach of 30 year bonds and their associated tax burden which has a significant burden on cost of living if affordable housing is more important than traffic congestion.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

I drive for a ride share service. I drive down streets that are lined with parked cars. In one nieghborhood cars are parked on what should be a sidewalk area. I attribute this to the fact that rents are so high that multiple roommmates are living there. Some older homes do not have garages. Only one car can fit in the driveway. ( if there is a driveway, again in the oldest parts of Bend, there may not be a driveway).

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

I would say yes if the city agreed to issue 2 street parking permits to each unit/household.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

The charm of Bend is being ruined by too many cars in downtown and the older developed neighbors. Traffic is worse and navigation of narrow streets is becoming more dangerous as they are shared with pedestrians and bicyclists. All new developments, both single and multiplexes, must provide parking for their tenants off the street!

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Our lovely city has already changed enough with everybody moving here from out of state. Please help maintain what little dignity we have left, and keep our city streets from becoming worse than they are. Mandatory parking spaces should be required for development. If you can’t provide parking, you should not build.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Once gone you can never reclaim that space this is a permanent decision that will create the need for a paid permit system for residents to park in front of their own homes. Many homes downtown do not have garages and only a small driveway. It will absolutely be cluttered with limited visibility for drivers in the area. This is not the direction we want to take Bend.
If you want a diverse population of residents then you need to make decisions that support that. This will drive out families with young children, where do they play? And park?
Disabled, elderly, all would have to walk to their vehicles. Only young people will live there.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

This is heading for further degradation of Bend. The streets of this town are cluttered with off property parking. If you eliminate off property parking requirements you will take a big step in making Bend a second class trashy unlivable town. Street parking is a huge problem as it is. Do you council people actually live here? Do you want to keep Bend a nice town or turn it into some millennial fantasy disaster. Very dumb idea to eliminate off property parking and put more cars on street parking. And no people will not magically forgo their cars and exclusively bike or walk. Every and kids. How are they going to school? Every have to go to a grocery store, the doctor - on a bike!.? I bike a lot but the need for a car will not suddenly disappear, for anyone. Come on council, grow up and act with some maturity and wisdom and not indulge in childish fantasy (no cars!) and destroy this town.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Once gone you can never reclaim that space this is a permanent decision that will create the need for a paid permit system for residents to park in front of their own homes. Many homes downtown do not have garages and only a small driveway. It will absolutely be cluttered with limited visibility for drivers in the area. This is not the direction we want to take Bend.
If you want a diverse population of residents then you need to make decisions that support that. This will drive out families with young children, where do they play? And park?
Disabled, elderly, all would have to walk to their vehicles. Only young people will live there.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

What an incredibly bad idea!

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

People own cars. They need to park them. Keep the streets uncluttered.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Some homes are small so garage must be used for stashed not parking

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Any new development needs to have onsite parking vs. curb site parking. Do we want our roads packed with nose to tail parked vehicles ? It is already bad enough.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

in my opinion. Reduced parking will benefit developers, potentially increase the cost of land and lead to congestion and deterioration in the quality of life in Bend. Transportation issues and housing affordability issues are interdependent but should be solved independently.

In my opinion, We need higher density housing to provide long term affordability. This is a permanent Solution. Density will enhance viability of walkability and effectiveness of transit. Let’s create hubs connected by transit.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

People have cars, especially in a community that is based on getting out to enjoy the wilderness and public space should not be relied upon for private residential parking.

Response:

Yes

Comment on Question #2:

I’ve seen landscape removed to meet parking requirements that have never been needed in our neighborhood. The removal of native landscapes changed the character of our community.
Thank you

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

As long as we have inadequate public transportation, people will require an automobile. And, they will need a place to park the car. Such a decision by the City of Bend would benefit the builders immensely but harm the residents. Not a good idea at all.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

If you’re going to tax me for road work, then you don’t get to do this to.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

All new housing should be required to provide 1 parking spot per bedroom.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

We don't want to make on-street parking more difficult than it is already. We don't want to have more neighborhoods where passage by cars is restricted by only one lane available between rows of parked cars on each side.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

It’s hazardous to have vehicles cluttering streets. There would have to be an entire redesign/construct to Bends infrastructure to accommodate parking if housing doesn’t provide an off street option. It’s already a problem in many older areas.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Creating a free-for-all for parking is not a good solution here. The city needs to be holding developers accountable for providing adequate parking for new construction. I live across the street from multiplexes that mostly house families, and each unit has approximately one off-street parking spot, and 1/2 of an on-street parking spot. The neighborhood is already dysfunctional and unattractive on account of so many cars being packed into such a small space. The parking space requirements are already inadequate, and eliminating them while allowing people to park anywhere will result in everyone parking in their yards and driving over curbs. Hold the city and the developers accountable for responsible development! Isn't it bad enough that every new development these days starts with clearcutting and leveling the entire parcel?! Bend is a fantastic place because of it's outdoor offerings. It makes no sense to turn it into a concrete jungle!

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

If the parking requirement is eliminated, where will cars be parked? I feel as though I'm missing something.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Absolutely not. Portland did this and it has been a disaster. It has ruined neighborhoods, as the streets are flooded with cars in many neighborhoods where this has happened. Eliminating off-street parking minimums does not mean people give up cars. That was the theory espoused by some in Portland, that people would just bike or take Portland transit. They don't. Most people who bicycle also have cars (including me). Streets in close in Portland NW, North, SE and NE (where my sister-in-law lives) that have allowed developers to build with no on-site parking, are literally filled with cars of those who live in this housing. And these cars spill over into neighborhoods with off-street parking, turning quiet neighborhoods into parking lots and lowering neighborhood quality. When we visit my wife's sister, there are cars parked in front of her house of people living many blocks away (she asks them). This bad policy is one of the reasons we left PDX, neighborhood quality was deteriorating.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Stop trying to tell the citizens of Bend how to live. There are so many new regulations and laws, that it's like living in California.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Every residence should bee required to have a minimum of one parking spot on the street.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Elimination of the requirement to provide parking is ludicrous!! Parking is terrible and getting worse. it should be a prerequisite, especially in the downtown, third street, and Old Mill areas.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

New construction should absolutely include a provision for off-street parking. some streets are becoming too congested to navigate safely due to the number of cars parked on street.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Until Bend can provide a robust mass transit system then we will still be dependent on cars for our daily routines. Street parking ruins the landscape of our community and, in fact, makes bike riding dangerous because the streets are more crowded.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Some streets are already way too crowded with cars. On certain 2-way streets, there's not enough room for cars going each way to pass each other due to parked cars. Another reason to minimize street parking is it looks trashy; is that what we want for our city?

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Go to any City in the world and you have people circling for hours trying to get a parking space, or see an elderly person carting their grocery bags two blocks as they can't park by their house or apartment. Once again, I don't think you are considering the elderly in Bend, thinking that everyone can walk a long distance or ride a bike. They have to be considered. We all know this is coming down from Portland, but we are not a big City, even although we will get there at this rate.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Having lived in communities that have removed the on-site parking requirement, it’s a disaster. If a developer doesn’t provide parking, that fact doesn’t lead to renters showing up without cars and taking bikes everywhere. As experienced in Portland, all those car owners ended up clogging the neighborhood streets and increasing the lack of curb parking for those already living there. A real mess, a negative impact on the surrounding neighborhood, and a resulting result of creating some very bad feelings by neighbors.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

On street parking is a hazard for bikers, pedestrians and drivers, as well as making it difficult to plow and street sweep. Quit cramming more people into an all ready over crowded city with an in adequate infrastructure.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

ADUs do not require off street parking. In most areas this promotes parking scarcity and is not acceptable for kids on streets with bikes.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

I like the idea of cars in driveways and off street parking a lot. I just wonder how this will influence an already tight crunch of affordable housing. I guess people could get creative

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Especially in residential areas where children live, it makes it dangerous to have cars parked all over the streets with children on bikes and scooters.

Response:

Yes

Comment on Question #2:

focus should be on garden size not parking. All housing developments in Bend are focused on the house size.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Insufficient parking will further congest our already maxed out roads. On street parking is also more dangerous for neighborhood children because it can block visibility.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Cars on both sides of roads like near Worthy brewery a huge liveability issues. Developers should provide space.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

the weather (cold and icy winter,hot steamy summer) would dictate a car trip to store,errands etc...there is not enough public transportation to support a car-less Bend.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Eliminating off-street parking is a cruel idea. My two daughters live in an apartment complex in Portland with inadequate off-street parking. They are forced to park wherever they can, often needing to walk long distances from their car to their apartment, alone at night in the dark, often getting parking tickets that they can't afford. Developers will love this idea, no doubt, because they can make more money by adding another living space rather than a parking spot, but for the people who live in the development this is a terrible, cruel rule. This rule only serves to make developers richer, at the expense of the poor.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Is causes tight streets and dangers to bike traffic and visibility issues. And many more abandoned vehicles.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Look at the parking now around any apartment complex in Bend, complete overcrowding on city streets. The city of Bend should raise the minimum of parking spaces available on property for that development’s residents.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Bend does not have enough off or on street parking as it is. Eliminating the requirement that new housing must provide a minimum number of off street parking spots will dramatically increase the problem that already exists. When only off street parking is used, people come home and can't find a place to park if there is not off street parking.

Response:

No

Comment on Question #2:

Even the idea of eliminatibg off-street parking in residential areas is ludicrous!!!